Friday, February 22, 2013

Just Posted at StencilGirlProducts.com -- my Stencil "Kaleid"

I'm dying to finish my first attempt at one of the techniques for stencil-use presented at Cindy Powell's blog --

http://cynthiapowell.blogspot.com/

-- but while my bottom coat of paint dries, I'll post two techniques for using Kaleid, the latest of my stencil designs (listed under "New Stencils") posted at www.StencilGirlProducts.com --

Below is a "ghost print" (the second print) I created using Kaleid and a Gelli Printing Plate.
There is a lot of online instruction on this type of monoprinting...

Using stencils is one way in which to use a Gelli Printing Plate or a homemade gelatin printing plate.   

Videos and other tutorial information can be found at these web addresses: 

Homemade Gelatin Printing Plates: 

http://printmakingwithoutapress.blogspot.com/2012/07/new-gelatin-printing-video-by-linda.html  (Note:  This video uses a variation of the technique I use.  The video mistakenly uses the word "stencil" -- and means to use the word "mask."   However, this technique-variation is worth a try -- using an actual stencil.) 

http://printmakingwithoutapress.blogspot.com/p/gelatin-printing-tips.html

(Note:  Lots of helpful info is on the above web page, if you are using a homemade gelatin printing plate.) 


http://cedarcanyontextiles.com/gelatin-printing-with-stencils-lesson-7/

(Note:  The above web address explains using stencils and gelatin printing plates with fabric.) 

youtube.com/watch?v=KRUMcgXK4UY

(Note:  In the above demo, the artist uses slow-drying acrylic extender mixed with her acrylic paints.  This is a common practice among printmakers.  Other options include "open acrylics" and printmaking inks; the latter come in oil-based versions and water-based versions.) 

Gelli Gel Printing Plates (which is what I used in creating the above example): 


 
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Another image I'm posting today is a greeting card cover:
 
 
The Shadow Knows!  To create an image like this, you will need a strong flow of light through a window, or use another source.  Find a way to secure a stencil in a position that results in its shadow being cast.  The shadow can be cast across a flat surface as shown above -- or across someone's face, if you want to create an unusual photo portrait!
 
After taking a photo of the Kaleid stencil's cast shadow, I printed it, cut it out with fancy-cut scissors and glued it to a greeting card cover.  On the lower right (difficult to see, here) I added a simple swirl of glitter glue.

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