Wednesday, March 26, 2014

Newly Created Backgrounds and Collage Elements

Click on the above image to enlarge it.  The imprint of Mimosa 6 can be seen at the top.  At bottom left, the imprint of Kaleid is visible.
  Starting with the paper above, I'm posting results from a recent session of my "scraping-paint-across-paper-atop-stencils" technique. (This technique has appeared in earlier posts, described in detail, with step-by-step photos.) 
 
This time around, I taped two of my 6"X6" stencils to the table under the paper -- Mimosa 6 and Kaleid.  Over them I placed a sheet of cheap paper with a glossy shine.
 
The paper's glossy finish enabled me to use it as palette paper, while working on my current acrylic painting on canvas.*  As I  finished using each color or color-blend, rather than letting each dollop of paint go to waste by drying, I used a credit card to scrape the wet paint across the glossy paper.
 
Because I had taped this paper atop the stencils, each scrape of leftover paint picked up the pattern of the stencil underneath the paper.  In the image at the start of this post, the imprint of Mimosa 6 can be seen at the top.  At bottom left, the imprint of Kaleid is visible.
 
Elsewhere, under the same paper, I had used making tape to secure another stencil of mine, Trivet A 9, to the table-top.
 After scraped paint had dried over that area, I went over that part of the paper with an Art Bar crayon:
 
In the photo above, the blue Art Bar crayon has heightened the imprint from my 9"X12" stencil Trivet A 9.
 
In the photo below,  paint has been scraped across my 6"X6" stencil  Kaleid -- 
 
 
*IMPORTANT NOTE:  I used cheap glossy paper -- not real palette paper.  If I had used palette paper, the scraped-on paint would eventually peel off.
 

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